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Issue 1.1

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After Baby Peter: overcoming the barriers to effective team work

The Every Child Matters agenda demands that agencies work together. But how? Philippa Sully shares what she thinks the barriers are – and how to overcome them.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Hearing young children’s voices

Hearing young children’s voices in the common assessment framework: There are more ways for children to express their needs than just talking. Sonia Mainstone-Cotton and Dr Janet Rose report.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Reports

We’re all supposed to be keeping up with the latest government thinking. But there’s just not enough time. That’s why Raspal Singh-Chima and Lucy Busuttil summarise the surveys, reports and government policy changes you need to brief yourself on in every issue of Every Child journal.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Back on track

At the moment, permanent exclusion is a death knell for young people. But the ‘Youth Achievement Foundation’ in Macclesfeld is trying to turn that around with its vocational focus. Eliza Vogel-Sharron reports.

Date:
09/10/2009
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More time to listen to children

Professionals must be given more time to listen to children. The Social Work Taskforce was set up by the government to do something very difficult. Its mission is to improve the quality and status of the social work profession in both adult and child services, boost recruitment and retention.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Staying together

Staying together: how indirect contact keeps children in touch with their fathers. Many children understand that family in-fghting means they can’t meet their father. But not receiving a birthday card can be heartbreaking. Salli Ward and Katherine Small explain, through a case study, how their charity Pro-Contact uses letters and pictures to encourage meaningful family relationships.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Building career aspirations at primary schools

Most schools take a half-hearted stab at careers-education with their teenage students. But a new government-funded programme, Headstart, says higher education needs to be promoted at primary-level. Gavin Bradshaw shares his research on the project.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Editorial - Notions of Childhood

Listening to children is not something we are very good at in the UK. This isn’t simply a bad cultural habit. It has its roots in two differing but connected notions of childhood, each of which gains dominance at different periods and provokes backlashes against the previously dominant concept.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Sensory integration through sport

Sport can be a brilliant way for children to develop sensory co-ordination - as well as lasting friendships. Sandy Eifon-Jones looks at ways of involving children with disability in fun physical activity within mainstream schools.

Date:
09/10/2009
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The limits of inclusion - Voices

With the growing government emphasis on inclusion, the role of special schools has become marginalised in education policy. Yet for many children, inclusion in the mainstream is a route to failure. a Head teacher of a special school, who has asked to remain anonymous, discussed three children who failed to make it in the mainstream with Howard Sharron.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Empowering the bullied child: three case studies

Many teachers feel helpless to stop the bullying they see in their classrooms. But with surveys, workshops and pupil engagement, schools can change, says Richard Sangster.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Social pedagogy: the practice

Social pedagogy is storming Europe as the leading social care philosophy of our time. But the UK is a long way behind. Sylvia Holthoff and Gabriel Eichsteller introduce the practice and its unique results.

Date:
09/10/2009
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The young depressed - how teachers can help

Numerous studies have shown how much teachers can do to help depressed young people. But, in reality, most teachers don’t have enough time, enough support from parents or enough health service support. Dr Cathy Street shares her research into teacher’s views on mental health.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Designated Teacher: a critical but daunting role

Every school should have a ‘Designated Teacher’ to advocate for Looked After students. It’s an enormous, daunting responsibility – but not if you’re brave enough to ask for help. Chris Stanway shares battle stories from her years as a Designated Teacher.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Every Child/Youth Matters: is it working?

Research suggests that indicators of need used by agencies are not directing resources to the right children, says Christine Hough.

Date:
09/10/2009
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Social Pedagogy: the UK context

Looked after children can have ten social workers at a time and are often shipped to a new children’s home every year. But a new model being piloted - ‘Social Pedagogy’ – is claimed to give children stability and security. Martin Thomas reports.

Date:
09/10/2009
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