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Issue 4.4

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ECJ 4.4 Cover

ECJ 4.4 Cover

Date:
01/07/2014
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ECJ 4.4 Editorial: Inclusivity and control

Inclusivity is such a simple principle, but achieving it in practice is a far more complex matter. September sees a whole range of government initiatives hitting schools, the most important of these being the Special Educational Needs code of practice. The guidance is welcome. Yet there is still a strong feeling that the thrust of education policy is moving away from inclusivity.

Date:
01/07/2014
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ECJ 4.4 Contents

What's in this issue?

Date:
01/07/2014
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ECJ 4.4 Developments and news

Texting improves children’s spelling and grammar; Study to examine how robots can boost learning of pupils with intellectual disabilities; Career guidance is failing pupils; Pupils in poor mental health unfairly labelled.

Date:
01/07/2014
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ECJ 4.4 Reports

Not present, what future? Children missing education in England; Advice note on maintained schools and academies in Birmingham; Selective schooling systems increase inequality; Strategies of parental protection for children online.

Date:
01/07/2014
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Raising the bar for pupils with SEN

Come the autumn, schools will be required to deliver the new SEN Code of Practice. So what do they need to have in place? Jan Martin explains.

Date:
01/07/2014
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The Cinderella syndrome

Why is it that in an otherwise loving family, one child is sometimes picked out for emotional abuse and neglect? Celia Doyle and Charles Timms analyse the Cinderella syndrome, tracing its mythical roots and the reasons behind victimisation.

Date:
01/07/2014
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Communication challenges

More information is emerging about the need to understand and help children with speech, learning and communication needs, yet many schools are still in the dark. Louise Kinnaird shines some light on the subject.

Date:
01/07/2014
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11 steps to inclusion

Just because the behaviour of some children challenges us doesn’t mean that they don’t deserve to be treated with dignity. And the purpose of inclusive policies is to ensure that all children can participate fully. So how do we go about doing it? Anna Gardiner explains.

Date:
01/07/2014
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A virtual head start

Children in care have notoriously poor educational outcomes. Constant moves, changes in carers and a complex system that has defied efforts to navigate it have all contributed. But can the new concept of a virtual head change all this? Victoria Hull investigates.

Date:
01/07/2014
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Goodbye to all that

Last month, Nigel Utton left his job of Headteacher at Bromstone Primary School, Broadstairs, Kent, after describing the treatment of children with special needs in education as “disgusting” in a live radio interview. Here he explains why.

Date:
01/07/2014
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The threat of FGM

There are over 60,000 victims of Female Genital Mutilation in the UK. In the light of recent high-profile cases, Kamaljit Thandi, head of the NSPCC’s helpline, gives advice on how teachers can protect their young pupils from becoming victims too.

Date:
01/07/2014
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Building a research-engaged school

How can research best improve school standards? Alex Elwick shows how a combination of research methods, including action research, and school leadership can create a dynamic educational model and build engagement with pupils and parents.

Date:
01/07/2014
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Not another special initiative!

Another day, another policy on safeguarding. Sounds familiar? Well this is the US experience. Howard S. Adelman and Linda Taylor argue that knee-jerk reactions of creating policy in response to calamitous events are overkill and counter-productive. Instead, integrated school policies provide a better alternative.

Date:
01/07/2014
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Crying for empathy

In a London classroom, Year Five children are looking after a new-born baby. It’s all part of a programme which aims to grow emotional intelligence and empathy, and reduce bullying and aggression. Danielle Batist reports.

Date:
01/07/2014
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